Please indicate which items you may need to rent before arriving. This can be  done on the booking form.

We will arrange this prior to your arrival, depending on where you will be based. Some courses include all equipment and will be stated on the course information, but if you are not sure, just ask.

We can arrange hire of the following

  • Harness from £4.00 a day
  • Climbing Helmet from £4.00 a day
  • Ice Axe from £5.00 a day EACH AXE
  • Crampons from £5.00 a day

Winter boots can be hired locally (from Nevisport, Ellis Brighams or Cotswold Outdoors) in Fort William, it is recommended that you book these well in advance as demand can be high during peak season (mid-Jan to mid-March, particularly weekends).

Recommended Kit List

Winter Skills & Summits / Hillwalking

Socks –Go for a medium to thick pair of synthetic or wool/synthetic blend socks. You may like to wear a thin liner pair underneath the thicker pair.

Thermal/Base Layers –A couple of thermal layers are useful, along with thermal leggings. Powerstretch works well.

Fleeces –At least one fleece layer for your upper body. If you get cold easily perhaps add a fleece gilet/vest to your layering. Having an extra fleece top or synthetic layer in a waterproof liner at the bottom of your rucksack is essential.

Synthetic Belay Jacket –Whilst not essential, will be a good booster layer.

Walking trousers –Polycotton, polyester or softshell is ideal.

Warm Hat & Waterproof Gloves –It is very important to look after your hands in winter. A thin pair, a thick warm waterproof pair and a pair of thick mittens will often all be used in one day on the Scottish Hills. If it’s particularly wet, then carry a couple of spare pairs.

Waterproof jacket and over trousers ( Outer shell clothing) –The trousers should have at least a knee length zip enabling them to be fitted over boots/crampons. This is an essential point to remember as winter boots are bulkier than summer ones.  Lightweight waterproofs are often inadequate under severe winter conditions. A large hood to fit over a helmet and your face with wired visor is essential for the jacket in winter.

Rucsac –A medium volume sac (30 -45 litres) is best for winter walking, with ice axe carrying loops. Use a strong plastic rucsac liner to keep the contents dry. External Rucsack covers have a habit of blowing away and don’t work as well as an internal liner.  Everything needs to fit inside your sac.

Bivvy Bag –A large person sized poly or foil survival bag is the minimum requirement, essential.

Gaiters or Stop-tous –Essential for all courses.

Head Torch –Essential for all courses, plus spare batteries.

First Aid kit –A small personal pack including medication for blisters. Suncream and sunglasses if good forecast.

Compass/Map –(OS sheet 41 & 34- 1:50 000 or BMC/Harveys Ben Nevis & Glencoe 1:40 000)
The map should be weather-proofed in a clear plastic map case or covered with clear sticky back plastic.

Whistle/Watch

Flask –0.5-1 litre for hot drinks on the hill. If you take a flask, a waterbottle is optional. Don’t carry too much liquid in winter!

Lunch & Spare Food

Ski Goggles

Trekking Poles -These are optional, but useful particularly in descent.

Boots –For winter hillwalking and skills courses, stiff, crampon compatible boots are required.  They should have a stiffness rating of B1 minimum, and ideally B2.  B3 boots are fine, so long as you find them comfortable.

Crampons –Should have 10 or 12 points and be compatible with your boots. Clip-on heel crampons  and front straps are very easy to fit on most modern B2 and B3 boots, whilst older traditional strap-on crampons are okay, but less easy to fit in cold windy conditions. We recommend anti-balling plates and cutting your straps to a suitable length (Not too short!). Ask for advice if you are unsure.

Ice Axe –For walking or general mountaineering an axe of 50 – 65cm is adequate.  Whether you choose to have a wrist loop or leash is up to you, we recommend going without as they can get in the way.

Helmet –Required for winter skills & summits courses, not necessarily required for guided winter hillwalks. Please check.

Winter Mountaineering

Socks –Go for a medium to thick pair of synthetic or wool/synthetic blend socks. You may like to wear a thin liner pair underneath the thicker pair.

Thermal/Base Layers –A couple of thermal layers are useful, along with thermal leggings. Powerstretch works well.

Fleeces –At least one fleece layer for your upper body. If you get cold easily perhaps add a fleece gilet/vest to your layering. Having an extra fleece top or synthetic layer in a waterproof liner at the bottom of your rucksack is essential.

Synthetic Belay Jacket –Whilst not essential, will be a good booster layer.

Walking trousers –Polycotton, polyester or softshell is ideal.

Warm Hat & Waterproof Gloves –It is very important to look after your hands in winter. A thin pair, a thick warm waterproof pair and a pair of thick mittens will often all be used in one day on the Scottish Hills. If it’s particularly wet, then carry a couple of spare pairs.

Waterproof jacket and over trousers ( Outer shell clothing) –The trousers should have at least a knee length zip enabling them to be fitted over boots/crampons. This is an essential point to remember as winter boots are bulkier than summer ones.  Lightweight waterproofs are often inadequate under severe winter conditions. A large hood to fit over a helmet and your face with wired visor is essential for the jacket in winter.

Rucsac –A medium volume sac (35 -50 litres) is best for winter mountaineering, with ice axe carrying loops. Use a strong plastic rucsac liner to keep the contents dry. External Rucsack covers have a habit of blowing away and don’t work as well as an internal liner.  Everything needs to fit inside your sac.

Bivvy Bag –A large person sized poly or foil survival bag is the minimum requirement, essential.

Gaiters or Stop-tous –Essential for all courses.

Head Torch –Essential for all courses, plus spare batteries.

First Aid kit –A small personal pack including medication for blisters. Suncream and sunglasses if good forecast.

Compass/Map –(OS sheet 41 & 34- 1:50 000 or BMC/Harveys Ben Nevis & Glencoe 1:40 000)
The map should be weather-proofed in a clear plastic map case or covered with clear sticky back plastic.

Whistle/Watch

Flask –0.5-1 litre for hot drinks on the hill. If you take a flask, a waterbottle is optional. Don’t carry too much liquid in winter!

Lunch & Spare Food

Ski Goggles

Trekking Poles -These are optional, but useful particularly in descent.

Boots –For mountaineering courses, stiff, crampon compatible boots are required.  They should have a stiffness rating of B1 minimum, and ideally B2 or B3.

Crampons –Should have 10 or 12 points and be compatible with your boots. Clip-on heel crampons  and front straps are very easy to fit on most modern B2 and B3 boots, whilst older traditional strap-on crampons are okay, but less easy to fit in cold windy conditions. We recommend anti-balling plates and cutting your straps to a suitable length (Not too short!). Ask for advice if you are unsure.

Ice Axe –For walking or general mountaineering an axe of 50 – 65cm is adequate.  Whether you choose to have a wrist loop or leash is up to you, we recommend going without as they can get in the way.

Helmet –Please bring one along if you can. We have DMM helmets available.

Harness –Please make sure the harness fits over thick clothing and can be put on over boots and crampons. Adjustable leg-loops are preferable for ease of fitting. The DMM Super Couloir or Black Diamond Bod harness is very good in this respect and is a good one harness suits all type.

Belay device, two HMS Carabiners and one 120cm sling –We can provide you with these if you don’t have your own.

Winter Climbing

Socks –Go for a medium to thick pair of synthetic or wool/synthetic blend socks. You may like to wear a thin liner pair underneath the thicker pair.

Thermal/Base Layers –A couple of thermal layers are useful, along with thermal leggings. Powerstretch works well.

Fleeces –At least one fleece layer for your upper body. If you get cold easily perhaps add a fleece gilet/vest to your layering. Having an extra fleece top or synthetic layer in a waterproof liner at the bottom of your rucksack is essential.

Synthetic Belay Jacket –Whilst not essential, will be a good booster layer.

Walking trousers –Polycotton, polyester or softshell is ideal.

Warm Hat & Waterproof Gloves –It is very important to look after your hands in winter. A thin pair, a thick warm waterproof pair and a pair of thick mittens will often all be used in one day on the Scottish Hills. If it’s particularly wet, then carry a couple of spare pairs.

Waterproof jacket and over trousers ( Outer shell clothing) –The trousers should have at least a knee length zip enabling them to be fitted over boots/crampons. This is an essential point to remember as winter boots are bulkier than summer ones.  Lightweight waterproofs are often inadequate under severe winter conditions. A large hood to fit over a helmet and your face with wired visor is essential for the jacket in winter.

Rucsac –A medium volume sac (35-50 litres) is best for winter climbing, with ice axe carrying loops. Use a strong plastic rucsac liner to keep the contents dry. External Rucsack covers have a habit of blowing away and don’t work as well as an internal liner.  Everything needs to fit inside your sac.

Bivvy Bag –A large person sized poly or foil survival bag is the minimum requirement, essential.

Gaiters or Stop-tous –Essential for all courses.

Head Torch –Essential for all courses, plus spare batteries.

First Aid kit –A small personal pack including medication for blisters. Suncream and sunglasses if good forecast.

Compass/Map –(OS sheet 41 & 34- 1:50 000 or BMC/Harveys Ben Nevis & Glencoe 1:40 000)
The map should be weather-proofed in a clear plastic map case or covered with clear sticky back plastic.

Whistle/Watch

Flask –0.5-1 litre for hot drinks on the hill. If you take a flask, a waterbottle is optional. Don’t carry too much liquid in winter!

Lunch & Spare Food

Ski Goggles

Trekking Poles -These are optional, but useful particularly in descent. Ideally they will collapse to fit inside your pack when not in use.

Boots –For climbing courses, stiff, crampon compatible boots are required.  They should have a stiffness rating of B2 minimum and ideally B3.

Crampons –Should have 12 or 14 points and be compatible with your boots. Clip-on heel crampons  and front straps are very easy to fit on most modern B2 and B3 boots, whilst older traditional strap-on crampons are okay, but less easy to fit in cold windy conditions. We recommend anti-balling plates and cutting your straps to a suitable length (Not too short!). Ask for advice if you are unsure.

Ice Axe –For winter climbing, two technical climbing axes (40-50cm) are required. Most folk these days use ‘leashless’ tools, which means not having traditional wrist loops, but will be attached to their tools via a lanyard or spring-leash. Ask if unsure.

Helmet –Please bring one along if you can. We have DMM helmets available.

Harness –Please make sure the harness fits over thick clothing and can be put on over boots and crampons. Adjustable leg-loops are preferable for ease of fitting. The DMM Super Couloir or Black Diamond Bod harness is very good in this respect and is a good one harness suits all type.

Belay device, two HMS Carabiners and one 120cm sling –We can provide you with these if you don’t have your own.

CIC Hut Week

Hut specific kit

Sleeping bag and liner –The hut is generally quite warm, even in the depths of winter, so a 2 or 3 season sleeping bag is fine.

Pillow –If you have space, then a packable pillow will be useful.

Casual clothes –You may wish to change out of your climbing clothing in the evenings. Don’t bring too much though.

Spare baselayers, underwear and socks –Again, enough but not too much.  Wet or damp clothes will dry quickly in the drying room.

Comfortable shoes for in and around the hut

Washkit –Don’t go OTT with a wash kit, the only really option for a proper wash is outside.  Wet wipes and antibacterial gel can help.

Earplugs

Books/cards

Toilet Roll

Small and big pack –You will probably walk-in with the small pack on your front, and a larger one on your back.  You will also need to carry group climbing equipment such as ropes.

Regular Climbing Kit

Socks –Go for a medium to thick pair of synthetic or wool/synthetic blend socks. You may like to wear a thin liner pair underneath the thicker pair.

Thermal/Base Layers –A couple of thermal layers are useful, along with thermal leggings. Powerstretch works well.

Fleeces –At least one fleece layer for your upper body. If you get cold easily perhaps add a fleece gilet/vest to your layering. Having an extra fleece top or synthetic layer in a waterproof liner at the bottom of your rucksack is essential.

Synthetic Belay Jacket –Whilst not essential, will be a good booster layer.

Walking trousers –Polycotton, polyester or softshell is ideal.

Warm Hat & Waterproof Gloves –It is very important to look after your hands in winter. A thin pair, a thick warm waterproof pair and a pair of thick mittens will often all be used in one day on the Scottish Hills. If it’s particularly wet, then carry a couple of spare pairs.

Waterproof jacket and over trousers ( Outer shell clothing) –The trousers should have at least a knee length zip enabling them to be fitted over boots/crampons. This is an essential point to remember as winter boots are bulkier than summer ones.  Lightweight waterproofs are often inadequate under severe winter conditions. A large hood to fit over a helmet and your face with wired visor is essential for the jacket in winter.

Rucsac –A medium volume sac (35-50 litres) is best for winter climbing, with ice axe carrying loops. Use a strong plastic rucsac liner to keep the contents dry. External Rucsack covers have a habit of blowing away and don’t work as well as an internal liner.  Everything needs to fit inside your sac.

Bivvy Bag –A large person sized poly or foil survival bag is the minimum requirement, essential.

Gaiters or Stop-tous –Essential for all courses.

Head Torch –Essential for all courses, plus spare batteries.

First Aid kit –A small personal pack including medication for blisters. Suncream and sunglasses if good forecast.

Compass/Map –(OS sheet 41 & 34- 1:50 000 or BMC/Harveys Ben Nevis & Glencoe 1:40 000)
The map should be weather-proofed in a clear plastic map case or covered with clear sticky back plastic.

Whistle/Watch

Flask –0.5-1 litre for hot drinks on the hill. If you take a flask, a waterbottle is optional. Don’t carry too much liquid in winter!

Lunch & Spare Food

Ski Goggles

Trekking Poles -These are optional, but useful particularly in descent. Ideally they will collapse to fit inside your pack when not in use.

Boots –For climbing courses, stiff, crampon compatible boots are required.  They should have a stiffness rating of B2 minimum and ideally B3.

Crampons –Should have 12 or 14 points and be compatible with your boots. Clip-on heel crampons  and front straps are very easy to fit on most modern B2 and B3 boots, whilst older traditional strap-on crampons are okay, but less easy to fit in cold windy conditions. We recommend anti-balling plates and cutting your straps to a suitable length (Not too short!). Ask for advice if you are unsure.

Ice Axe –For winter climbing, two technical climbing axes (40-50cm) are required. Most folk these days use ‘leashless’ tools, which means not having traditional wrist loops, but will be attached to their tools via a lanyard or spring-leash. Ask if unsure.

Helmet –Please bring one along if you can. We have DMM helmets available.

Harness –Please make sure the harness fits over thick clothing and can be put on over boots and crampons. Adjustable leg-loops are preferable for ease of fitting. The DMM Super Couloir or Black Diamond Bod harness is very good in this respect and is a good one harness suits all type.

Belay device, two HMS Carabiners and one 120cm sling –We can provide you with these if you don’t have your own.

Spring / Summer Mountaineering

Socks –Go for a medium to thick pair of synthetic or wool/synthetic blend socks.

Thermal/Base Layers –A thermal or wicking top is far better than cotton.

Fleeces –At least one fleece layer for your upper body. If you get cold easily perhaps add a fleece gilet/vest to your layering. Having an extra fleece top or synthetic layer in a waterproof liner at the bottom of your rucksack is useful if cool conditions are likely to be encountered.

Windshirt or lightweight softshell jacket –Ideal for dry conditions.

Walking trousers –Polycotton, polyester or softshell is ideal.

Warm Hat & Gloves –A warm hat can still be very useful even in summer.  For Skye, leather work or gardening gloves, which are cheap and durable are ideal. Remember that even in the height of summer, with a bit of rain and wind, it will still be quite chilly.

Waterproof jacket and over trousers ( Outer shell clothing) –The trousers should have at least a knee length zip enabling them to be fitted over boots.  Lightweight waterproofs are ok.

Rucsac –A medium volume sac (30 -40 litres) is best for mountaineering. Use a strong plastic rucsac liner to keep the contents dry. External Rucsack covers have a habit of blowing away and don’t work as well as an internal liner.  Everything needs to fit inside your sac.

Bivvy Bag –A large person sized poly or foil survival bag is the minimum requirement, essential.

Gaiters or Stop-tous –Useful, but not essential. Not really necessary on the Skye Cuillins.

Head Torch –Even in summer it’s good practise to carry a small headtorch.

First Aid kit –A small personal pack including medication for blisters. Suncream and sunglasses if good forecast.

Compass/Map –(OS or BMC/Harveys)
Harvey maps produce the best map for Skye. The map should be weather-proofed in a clear plastic map case or covered with clear sticky back plastic.

Whistle/Watch

Waterbottle –1 to 2 litres, maybe more during hot weather.

Lunch & Spare Food

Trekking Poles -These are optional, but useful particularly in descent.

Boots –For scrambling, boots which have good lateral stiffness, such as B1 rated boots, are useful.

Helmet –Please bring one along if you can. We have DMM helmets available.

Harness –Please make sure the harness fits over all clothing and can be put on over boots and crampons. Adjustable leg-loops are preferable for ease of fitting.

Belay device, two HMS Carabiners and one 120cm sling –We can provide you with these if you don’t have your own.

Skye Cuillin Ridge Traverses

Overnight Bivi Kit

Bivi Bag –Ideally a lightweight Gore-Tex or other breathable fabric bivi bag

Sleeping Bag –This should be a light-weight 2 or 3 season bag.

Sleeping Mat –Either a closed cell foam mat (karrimat) or a small Thermarest style mat.

Meals –For breakfast and dinners, dehydrated packets, available from most outdoor shops are ideal. Avoid already hydrated meals as these are heavy. You will also need two days worth of lunch and snacks (energy bars/dried fruit). Your guide will bring a stove and gas, which you may need to carry.

Spoon & mug –Both lightweight as possible.

Regular scrambling kit

Socks –Go for a medium to thick pair of synthetic or wool/synthetic blend socks.

Thermal/Base Layers –A thermal or wicking top is far better than cotton.

Fleeces –At least one fleece layer for your upper body. If you get cold easily perhaps add a fleece gilet/vest to your layering. Having an extra fleece top or synthetic layer in a waterproof liner at the bottom of your rucksack is useful if cool conditions are likely to be encountered.

Windshirt or lightweight softshell jacket –Ideal for dry conditions.

Walking trousers –Polycotton, polyester or softshell is ideal.

Warm Hat & Gloves –A warm hat can still be very useful even in summer.  For Skye, leather work or gardening gloves, which are cheap and durable are ideal. Remember that even in the height of summer, with a bit of rain and wind, it will still be quite chilly.

Waterproof jacket and over trousers ( Outer shell clothing) –The trousers should have at least a knee length zip enabling them to be fitted over boots.  Lightweight waterproofs are ok.

Rucsac –A medium volume sac (40 -50 litres) is best for traverse with an overnight bivi. Use a strong plastic rucsac liner to keep the contents dry. External Rucsack covers have a habit of blowing away and don’t work as well as an internal liner.  Everything needs to fit inside your sac.

Gaiters or Stop-tous –Not really necessary on the Skye Cuillins.

Head Torch –Even in summer it’s good practise to carry a small headtorch.

First Aid kit –A small personal pack including medication for blisters. Suncream and sunglasses if good forecast.

Compass/Map –(OS or BMC/Harveys)
Harvey maps produce the best map for Skye. The map should be weather-proofed in a clear plastic map case or covered with clear sticky back plastic.

Whistle/Watch

Waterbottle –1 to 2 litres, maybe more during hot weather. For traverses, one bladder and one solid bottle is useful.

Trekking Poles -These are optional, but useful particularly in descent. To keep weight down, consider taking only one, that can be either compressed or collapsed to fit inside your pack when not in use.

Boots –For scrambling, boots which have good lateral stiffness, such as B1 rated boots, are useful.

Helmet –Please bring one along if you can. We have DMM helmets available.

Harness –Please make sure the harness fits over all clothing and can be put on over boots and crampons. Adjustable leg-loops are preferable for ease of fitting.

Belay device, two HMS Carabiners  –We can provide you with these if you don’t have your own.